Contact Us   |   Print Page   |   Report Abuse   |   Sign In   |   Register
Magic Week

National Magic week is traditionally the last 7 days of October (October 25th-31st).  The purpose of National Magic Week is to celebrate the charitable work done by the S.A.M, S.A.M. Assemblies and S.A.M. members throughout the year.

The roots of National Magic Week date back over 90 years.  In the summer of 1927, less than one year after the death of Harry Houdini, a “Houdini Day” was established.  In 1938, Les Sholty, a Chicago member of the Society of American Magicians, sought official sanction for a “Houdini Day.”  A friend of the Houdini’s requested and obtained permission from Mrs. Houdini to proclaim October 31st as National Magic Day in honor of Harry Houdini.  A plan was formulated to celebrate this day by having free magic performances for shut-ins and the handicapped, who would otherwise not be able to go out and enjoy a show.  The first radio broadcast about National Magic Day occurred on July 20, 1938 on Radio station KQW.  Mrs. Houdini participated in that broadcast.

It wasn’t long before National Magic Day became National Magic Week.

Today, S.A.M. members and Assemblies celebrate National Magic Week in a variety of ways.  Most often it is celebrated in the same way it has been for over 80 years, by giving free performances for retirement homes, hospitals, orphanages and for others who wouldn’t be able to get out to see a magic show.  Many Assemblies also seek proclamations from state and local officials declaring the last 7 days of October “National Magic Week.”  Assemblies and members are also encouraged to put magic displays in libraries during this week.

S.A.M. Assemblies and members should send a list of their planned events to National Magic Week Chair, Tom Gentile.  These events will be published on the website to give the Assemblies and members well-deserved credit for their charitable work.  Assemblies and individuals are also asked to submit their National Magic Week activities photos, publicity received, scans of Proclamations and letter of recognition as well as any other National Magic Week items.

Remember.  Although National Magic Week is the last 7 days of October, the intent and purpose of National Magic Week is to celebrate the charitable contributions, good deeds and good work done by S.A.M. Assemblies and members ALL YEAR LONG.

Our Assembly Wants to Participate in National Magic Week… What now???

Your assembly wants to participate and organize a contribution to “National Magic Week.” But how do you go about it? First and foremost someone has to be in charge to run and coordinate the events, a chairperson or a committee to run your Assembly’s National Magic Week has to be selected.

Contact the recreation person or persons whose job it is to handle any special events at hospitals, Veterans Centers, some schools and senior centers. Get all of the contact information; such as a person’s name, correct telephone numbers, possible date or dates. Find out about parking, whether it is free or do you have to pay, exact address of location, performance area, if there is a microphone or sound system, unloading area, etc.

Once the date and time are confirmed make up sheets with all of the information, the name of the organization. Also what type of magic can be performed? Close up, strolling or a stage show. Most hospitals will not allow animals, balloons or fire. Make copies of all of the locations and bring to your SAM meeting.

Sometimes a tri-fold poster board with additional information can help get volunteers from your assembly. You can make up a “We Want You” type poster with assorted information about National Magic Week; the history of National Magic Week, etc. Check below for some great information and ideas about National Magic Week.

National Magic Week can be a very rewarding experience for everyone who participates.  If you need help promoting National Magic Week in your Assembly, contact National Magic Week Chairperson, Thomas Gentile at tdgmagic@gmail.com

Magic Week History Facts and Information

Houdini died at 1:26 PM on October 31 in 1926 and was president of the Society for the previous nine years.

During the year the members of the S.A.M. perform for Senior Citizens in nursing homes, plus in VA Hospitals and for schools and libraries for children who cannot afford the luxury of live entertainment. The free shows are part of the service programs by its members. Magic Week is when the magicians can take their bows. Public magic events and exhibits will be taking place all over the country.

Each year governors, mayors and other governing bodies throughout the country are requested to issue proclamations declaring the last week in October as National Magic Week, encouraging magicians throughout the country to participate in the activities.

The Society of American Magicians adopted the idea of National Magic Week as a way of promoting the Art of Magic by performing shows at orphanages, hospitals and nursing homes for those who would have difficulty getting to a theatre to see a live performance. The members of the Society of American Magicians that participate in these shows find it a rewarding activity. Many people enjoy magic shows during this week that otherwise would not be able to do so.

The roots of National Magic Week go back over 80 years. Before there was a National Magic Week there was a National Magic Day. It all started with a “Houdini Day” in the summer of 1927, less than one year from the death of Harry Houdini. A trophy in honor of Houdini, who served as the President of the Society of American Magicians for nine years until his death on October 31, 1926, was presented by Mrs. Harry Houdini in New York City.

There were many other “Houdini Days” following, but it was not until 1938 that Les Sholty, a Chicago member of the Society of American Magicians, sought official sanction for a “Houdini Day.” A friend of the Houdini’s requested and obtained permission from Mrs. Houdini to proclaim October 31 as National Magic Day in honor of Harry Houdini. The plan was formulated at that time to have free performances for shut-ins and handicapped people.

Many newspapers carried the story about National Magic Day and various magical societies kept the idea alive. It was not long when National Magic Day became National Magic Week.

The first radio broadcast about National Magic Day occurred over radio station KQW on July 20, 1938. Mrs. Harry Houdini participated in that broadcast.

Magic displays can be found at libraries, stores and malls throughout the country during National Magic Week.

Each Assembly of the Society of American Magicians is encouraged to send in a list of their planned events so they may be published on the website. Additionally, each Assembly is encouraged to submit their Magic Week activities photos, publicity received, scans of Proclamations and letters of recognition and all other Magic Week items for publication on the website. Items should be sent to the Magic Week Chair, Tom Gentile tdgmagic@gmail.com

National Magic Week is the S.A.M.’s and the magical fraternity’s way of sharing with others in a great art form that is deeply loved by those who participate in it.

To read the current Society of American Magicians Proclamation of Magic Week, just click the link. The News Page will list upcoming magic week events around the country as the time approaches.

If you are a performer, to report your event, Click HERE

If you are an Assembly, to report your event, Click HERE

Download the Magic Week Informational Flyer here.

ALL publicity, press, proclamations etc relating to Magic Week are to be sent to:

National Magic Week Chairperson:
Tom Gentile tdgmagic@gmail.com

more Calendar

The upcoming calendar is currently empty.

Click here to view past events and photos »

Spotlight Members

Online Surveys
Association Management Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal